Funny Scholar Photos
Love this graphic of Hegel. Does this happen to you: working on your project (*cough* Adorno) and you keep telling yourself NOT to trace every source/idea/author that you subject-of-study knew intimately. Yet, you find yourself on the couch with a book that is NOT directly applicable to your topic, just so you are more in the topic’s head (so to speak)!! 

“The goal is Spirit’s insight into what knowing is. Impatience demands the impossible, to wit, the attainment of the end without means. But the length of this path has to be endured, because, for one thing, each moment is necessary; and further, each moment has to be lingered over, because each is a complete individual shape…” (Phenomenology of spirit, preface, p. 17)

Love this graphic of Hegel. Does this happen to you: working on your project (*cough* Adorno) and you keep telling yourself NOT to trace every source/idea/author that you subject-of-study knew intimately. Yet, you find yourself on the couch with a book that is NOT directly applicable to your topic, just so you are more in the topic’s head (so to speak)!!

“The goal is Spirit’s insight into what knowing is. Impatience demands the impossible, to wit, the attainment of the end without means. But the length of this path has to be endured, because, for one thing, each moment is necessary; and further, each moment has to be lingered over, because each is a complete individual shape…” (Phenomenology of spirit, preface, p. 17)

strandbooks:

“We carry our homes within us which enables us to fly.” - John Cage
(photo from Where the Heart Beats)

strandbooks:

We carry our homes within us which enables us to fly.
- John Cage

(photo from Where the Heart Beats)

Scholars and their books. Love the pose Eco’s facial expressions are the best.

“True learning must not be content with ideas, which are, in fact, signs, but must discover things in their individual truth.” 
― Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

Scholars and their books. Love the pose Eco’s facial expressions are the best.

“True learning must not be content with ideas, which are, in fact, signs, but must discover things in their individual truth.”
― Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

academiccoachtaylor:

Academic Coach Taylor has some advice for you #scms12

academiccoachtaylor:

Academic Coach Taylor has some advice for you #scms12

Recently I’ve been intrigued by Zizek, mainly because when I read his books the language doesn’t put me to sleep… can I say that. 
From Salon.com interview”Slavoj Zizek: I am not the world’s hippest philosopher.”
"What would Hegel think of your popularity?
He wouldn’t have any problems with it. He even wrote — I think at the end of “Phenomenology“ — that if, as a philosopher, you really articulate the spirit of the time, the result is popularity … even if people don’t really understand you. They somehow feel it. It’s a beautiful dialectical question: How do the people feel it?”

Recently I’ve been intrigued by Zizek, mainly because when I read his books the language doesn’t put me to sleep… can I say that.

From Salon.com interview”Slavoj Zizek: I am not the world’s hippest philosopher.”

"What would Hegel think of your popularity?

He wouldn’t have any problems with it. He even wrote — I think at the end of “Phenomenology“ — that if, as a philosopher, you really articulate the spirit of the time, the result is popularity … even if people don’t really understand you. They somehow feel it. It’s a beautiful dialectical question: How do the people feel it?”

"Plath, like all great poets, is ruthless in her pursuit of the poem. Although, as in the case of Oscar Wilde, say, or the war poets, we cannot think of the work without the life: she had a kind of lunar detachment that ultimately sets her poems free of herself. That is why they continue to have life."
I read a fantastic article, which I now can’t find, about how we can talk about the content of Sylvia Plath’s poems and NOT just her life. Thus giving the poems the critical and artistic depth they deserve. Nevertheless I found this article, which is really appreciative.

"Plath, like all great poets, is ruthless in her pursuit of the poem. Although, as in the case of Oscar Wilde, say, or the war poets, we cannot think of the work without the life: she had a kind of lunar detachment that ultimately sets her poems free of herself. That is why they continue to have life."

I read a fantastic article, which I now can’t find, about how we can talk about the content of Sylvia Plath’s poems and NOT just her life. Thus giving the poems the critical and artistic depth they deserve. Nevertheless I found this article, which is really appreciative.

beingblog:

“For there is nothing heavier than compassion. Not even one’s own pain weighs so heavy as the pain one feels with someone, for someone, a pain intensified by the imagination.”
~Milan Kundera from The Unbearable Lightness of Being
Listen to: Compassion’s Edge States: Roshi Joan Halifax on Caring Better
photo Hartwig HKD

beingblog:

“For there is nothing heavier than compassion. Not even one’s own pain weighs so heavy as the pain one feels with someone, for someone, a pain intensified by the imagination.”

~Milan Kundera from The Unbearable Lightness of Being

Listen to: Compassion’s Edge States: Roshi Joan Halifax on Caring Better

photo Hartwig HKD

Hannah Arendt- the first female scholar I’ve posted (odd, I’ll have to rectify this situation). So many photos I’ve found I her feature a cigarette; I particularly like the lounging photo!
——

"It is true that storytelling reveals meaning without committing the error of defining it, that it brings about consent and reconciliation with things as they really are, and that we may even trust it to contain eventually by implication that last word which we expect from the Day of Judgment”.

- Hannah Arendt, “Isak Dinesen: 1885 – 1963” in Men in Dark Times
(See, hannaharendtcenter.org/?p=5229)

According to Arendt, it is through action – and all action is but acts of speech – that human beings disclose themselves in their whoness rather than merely on the basis of their whatness. Her indebtedness for storytelling comes from a two-fold source: The Greek world on the one hand - the poets and the historians, and on the other the writings of Isak Dinesen.

Hannah Arendt- the first female scholar I’ve posted (odd, I’ll have to rectify this situation). So many photos I’ve found I her feature a cigarette; I particularly like the lounging photo!
——

"It is true that storytelling reveals meaning without committing the error of defining it, that it brings about consent and reconciliation with things as they really are, and that we may even trust it to contain eventually by implication that last word which we expect from the Day of Judgment”.

- Hannah Arendt, “Isak Dinesen: 1885 – 1963” in Men in Dark Times
(See, hannaharendtcenter.org/?p=5229)

According to Arendt, it is through action – and all action is but acts of speech – that human beings disclose themselves in their whoness rather than merely on the basis of their whatness. Her indebtedness for storytelling comes from a two-fold source: The Greek world on the one hand - the poets and the historians, and on the other the writings of Isak Dinesen.

morganmrich:

Back to basics.
“Syllogisms are structures of sentences each of which can meaningfully be called true or false: assertions (apophanseis), in Aristotle’s terminology. According to Aristotle, every such sentence must have the same structure: it must contain a subject (hupokeimenon) and a predicate and must either affirm or deny the predicate of the subject. Thus, every assertion is either the affirmation kataphasis or the denial (apophasis) of a single predicate of a single subject.” http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/aristotle-logic/
Always remember the importance of structure in creating your arguments! Also, is this image not a “Hey Girl” posturing???

morganmrich:

Back to basics.

“Syllogisms are structures of sentences each of which can meaningfully be called true or false: assertions (apophanseis), in Aristotle’s terminology. According to Aristotle, every such sentence must have the same structure: it must contain a subject (hupokeimenon) and a predicate and must either affirm or deny the predicate of the subject. Thus, every assertion is either the affirmation kataphasis or the denial (apophasis) of a single predicate of a single subject.” http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/aristotle-logic/

Always remember the importance of structure in creating your arguments! Also, is this image not a “Hey Girl” posturing???

Martin Heidegger. This photo goes along with the theme I am trying to grow… scholars in their “bathing” attire or postures. See the Adorno post. 
I’m pretty sure he’s asking us to NOT ever to use phrases such as, “as such” or “being there” like we are “name dropping.” 
I post a picture of Heidegger today because this weekend I was at a scholarly conference, giving a paper, and had the most “awesome” awkward scholar experiences (you know you’ve had them.) In the question session, after 3 papers, one woman was questioning a speaker (reading his paper on Heidegger and the authenticity of self in Being and Time) very pointedly wanted to discuss ONE WORD. Lady: “I ONLY read Heidegger in the German, you said “Entanglement” now what is the German in your version that elicited THAT translation.” OMG. What the guy should have said was… I’m giving a paper in English, so I relied on the accepted English translation. 

But I digress. Heidegger and his beach chair. Yeah. 

Martin Heidegger. This photo goes along with the theme I am trying to grow… scholars in their “bathing” attire or postures. See the Adorno post. 

I’m pretty sure he’s asking us to NOT ever to use phrases such as, “as such” or “being there” like we are “name dropping.” 

I post a picture of Heidegger today because this weekend I was at a scholarly conference, giving a paper, and had the most “awesome” awkward scholar experiences (you know you’ve had them.) In the question session, after 3 papers, one woman was questioning a speaker (reading his paper on Heidegger and the authenticity of self in Being and Time) very pointedly wanted to discuss ONE WORD. Lady: “I ONLY read Heidegger in the German, you said “Entanglement” now what is the German in your version that elicited THAT translation.” OMG. What the guy should have said was… I’m giving a paper in English, so I relied on the accepted English translation. 

But I digress. Heidegger and his beach chair. Yeah.